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Living near oil and gas wells may increase preterm birth risk

Danielle Torrent Tucker
Jun 9 2020

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New research shows living near oil and gas development in California is a risk factor for preterm birth, the leading cause of infant death in the United States. About 2.1 million Californians live within one mile of an active oil or gas well.

A pumpjack operating a well in the Signal Hill neighborhood in Los Angeles County, California. In the San Joaquin Valley, where pumpjacks are also in close proximity to houses, researchers found living near oil and gas development is a risk factor for spontaneous preterm birth.

A pumpjack operating a well in the Signal Hill neighborhood in Los Angeles County, California. In the San Joaquin Valley, where pumpjacks are also in close proximity to houses, researchers found living near oil and gas development is a risk factor for spontaneous preterm birth.
Photo credit: David Gonzalez

 

Read more on the Stanford Earth website.

 

 

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