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Environment and Energy

Why are California's Oils Some of the World's Dirtiest: A Panel with the Oil-Climate Index Team

Global warming is likely to reach 1.5°C as early as 2030. In an effort to limit the earth’s temperature rise beyond this point, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has developed pathways to decarbonize energy supplies. Meeting these targets will be a tall order for the oil and gas sector. Massive reserves remain worldwide to manufacture transport fuels and countless consumer products. In California, where the oil industry took off 150 years ago, the climate impacts of petroleum are among the largest in the world.

Introduction to California and Western Energy: Video series

This series, developed by Bill Lane Center Affiliated Scholar and Precourt Energy Scholar Dian Grueneich, provides an understanding of California and Western energy, including relevant agencies and organizations, what they do, and how they operate. The videos cover California government agencies, California energy markets, stakeholders, and the two key Western energy organizations. The final lecture covers the major California climate and energy policies, including achievement, challenges, and innovation opportunities.

“Saving Lighthouse Point” – Pilot Podcast

Outside of the city’s famed Boardwalk, few places are as iconic in the coastal city of Santa Cruz as Lighthouse Point. Yet in 1970, the City Council approved a major construction project that sought to develop every square foot of Lighthouse Point and adjacent Lighthouse Field, turning one of the city’s last open parcels of coastal land into a bustling tourist and business hub. Bolstered by the creation of the Coastal Commission, the citizens of Santa Cruz organized to save Lighthouse Point, a battle that would come to stand as a watershed moment in the city’s history.

Public Receptivity in China Towards Wind Energy Generators: A Survey Experimental Approach

China leads the world's wind energy market, but little has been written about public receptivity towards wind energy generators in China. To fill this gap, we pursue a survey experimental approach to examine explanations for receptivity based on evidence from OECD countries as well as the importance of public knowledge in augmenting public acceptance of wind energy generators in China.

Reducing Local Capacity Bias in Government Grantsmanship

Local governments with more fiscal and administrative resources are at an advantage for obtaining numerous intergovernmental grants. Although many studies have examined the impact of this local capacity bias on grant getting, there has been minimal research on how grant programs could reduce it. We evaluate the effectiveness of two actions that federal and state grant programs have taken to decrease local capacity bias for economically disadvantaged communities, providing matching fund waivers and preferential scoring.

Environental Governance and Climate Resilience: Regional Reports

Student presentations on sea level rise adaptation strategies around the United States, and how they might inform policy decisions on the Pacific Coast. These were produced for the Fall 2018 course, "Environmental Governance and Climate Resilience," taught by Professors Bruce E. Cain and Len Ortolano. They were presented to a public workshop on Dec. 10, 2018.


 

Felicity Barringer on KJZZ’s ‘The Show’

About 180 miles south of San Diego, in the arid region of Baja California in an area called the San Quentin valley, there are seemingly endless fields full of strawberries.

It’s a region that’s already incredibly dry, and a crop that’s incredibly thirsty. Despite this, they are so profitable, farmers there won’t stop growing them anytime soon.

So with an ongoing drought and climate change on the horizon, how will the industry sustain itself?

Planning for America’s Water Infrastructure Needs

A paper based on ideas participants discussed at the conference “Planning for America’s Water Infrastructure Needs,” namely the five challenges that all water managers face and three particular water infrastructure issues: the opportunities afforded by considering water systems as “loops,” the importance of resiliency in response to climate change, and the reforms in federal, state, and private funding mechanisms that can facilitate water infrastructure financing. 

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