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Student Work

Midpeninsula Cities Police Reform Presentation

This summer project on policing reform with six mid-peninsula cities was conducted through the Bill Lane Center at Stanford in collaboration with the Office of External Relations which is working to strengthen Stanford's engagement in the region. The areas of police reform covered were independent oversight of police departments, data collection and standards, and culture change in public safety.

Igniting a Culture of Change: Evaluating the Los Trancos Community Maintenance District Home Hardening and Defensible Space Incentive Program

The state of California has experienced an increase in catastrophic wildfires in recent years, impacting our homes, environment, and economy. Wildfires, like the Tubbs Fire that burned in Northern California in 2017, are difficult to prevent, but as community members, we can ensure our homes are equipped to reduce wildfire risk and minimize destruction of our communities.

Sophomore College Students Explore Clean Energy Technology and Policy in Hawaii

Before the start of the 2019-2020 academic year, the Bill Lane Center and the Precourt Institute for Energy sponsored a Sophomore College course exploring the practical, social, technical, and political issues surrounding energy production and use in Hawaii. Hawaii is at the forefront of technical changes in the electric grid and the uses of electricity, with an aspirational goal for 100% carbon-free electricity in 2045.

Daguerreotypes on the Western Landscape: A profile and interview with artist Binh Danh

In association with the Center’s ArtsWest event, Self Landing: Daguerreotypes on the Western Landscapethe Art History and Political Science major Alexandra (Mac) Taylor ’20 created an artist provile and conducted an interview with artist Binh Dahn about his journey as an artist and reflections on photography. 

Environental Governance and Climate Resilience: Regional Reports

Student presentations on sea level rise adaptation strategies around the United States, and how they might inform policy decisions on the Pacific Coast. These were produced for the Fall 2018 course, "Environmental Governance and Climate Resilience," taught by Professors Bruce E. Cain and Len Ortolano. They were presented to a public workshop on Dec. 10, 2018.


 

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