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Courses on the American West

Each year, Stanford University offers dozens of courses related to the study of the North American West across a wide range of departments and programs. In addition to offering classes like our interdisciplinary spring quarter course The American West, The Bill Lane Center for the American West curates a listing of courses related to the American West.

Use the form at lower left to filter courses by academic year, quarter, and to search for department codes and course titles.

Related Article

Winter Courses Shine New Light on the American West

With the new year and winter quarter approaching, we are pleased to highlight two new courses that will be taught by affiliates of the Bill Lane Center.

Quick Links: The American West Course

Title Quarter Day, Time, Location Instructor(s) Description
AMSTUD 117 (section 1)
Race, Gender, and Sexuality in Contemporary American Film (AFRICAAM 117J, ASNAMST 117D, CSRE 117D, FEMGEN 117F)
2019-2020 Autumn
Tuesday
6:00pm - 8:50pm
160-314
Gow, W., Gow, W.

This course introduces students to the theoretical and analytical frameworks necessary to critically understand constructions of race, gender, and sexuality in contemporary American film. Through a sustained engagement with a range of independent and Hollywood films produced since 2000, students... more

AMSTUD 186D (section 1)
Asian American Art: 1850-Present (ARTHIST 186B, ASNAMST 186B)
2019-2020 Autumn
Tuesday Thursday
4:30pm - 5:50pm
McMurtry Building rm 350
Kwon, M.

What does it mean, and what has it meant historically, to be "Asian American" in the United States? This lecture course explores this question through the example of artists, craftspeople, and laborers of Asian descent. We will consider their work alongside the art, visual culture, and... more

ARCHLGY 111B (section 1)
Muwekma: Landscape Archaeology and the Narratives of California Natives (ANTHRO 111C, NATIVEAM 111B)
2019-2020 Autumn
Monday Wednesday
1:30pm - 2:50pm
260-007
Wilcox, M.

This course explores the unique history of San Francisco Bay Area tribes with particular attention to Muwekma Ohlone- the descendent community associated with the landscape surrounding and including Stanford University. The story of Muwekma provides a window into the history of California... more

ARTHIST 186B (section 1)
Asian American Art: 1850-Present (AMSTUD 186D, ASNAMST 186B)
2019-2020 Autumn
Tuesday Thursday
4:30pm - 5:50pm
McMurtry Building rm 350
Kwon, M.

What does it mean, and what has it meant historically, to be "Asian American" in the United States? This lecture course explores this question through the example of artists, craftspeople, and laborers of Asian descent. We will consider their work alongside the art, visual culture, and... more

BIO 10SC (section 1)
Natural History, Marine Biology, and Research
2018-2019 Summer
Thompson, S.

Monterey Bay is home to the nation¿s largest marine sanctuary and also home to Stanford's Hopkins Marine Station. This course, based at Hopkins, explores the spectacular biology of Monterey Bay and the artistic and political history of the region. We will conduct investigations across all of... more

CEE 141A (section 1)
Infrastructure Project Development (CEE 241A)
2019-2020 Autumn
Monday Wednesday Friday
8:30am - 10:20am
Gates B12
Moscovich, J.

Infrastructure is critical to the economy, global competitiveness and quality of life. Topics include energy, transportation, water, public facilities, and communications sectors. Analysis of the condition of the nation's infrastructure and how projects are planned and financed. Focus is on... more

EARTHSYS 160 (section 1)
Sustainable Cities (URBANST 164)
2019-2020 Autumn
Monday Wednesday
10:30am - 12:20pm
Lathrop 190
Chan, D.

Service-learning course that exposes students to sustainability concepts and urban planning as a tool for determining sustainable outcomes in the Bay Area. Focus will be on the relationship of land use and transportation planning to housing and employment patterns, mobility, public health, and... more

HISTORY 173 (section 1)
Mexican Migration to the United States (AMSTUD 73, CHILATST 173, HISTORY 73)
2019-2020 Autumn
Monday Wednesday
1:30pm - 2:50pm
200-107
Minian Andjel, A., Bazzi, F.

(History 73 is 3 units; History 173 is 5 units.) This class examines the history of Mexican migration to the United States. In the United States we constantly hear about Obama's immigration plan, the anti-immigrant laws in Arizona, and the courage of DREAM Activists; in Mexico news sources speak... more

HISTORY 73 (section 1)
Mexican Migration to the United States (AMSTUD 73, CHILATST 173, HISTORY 173)
2019-2020 Autumn
Monday Wednesday
1:30pm - 2:50pm
200-107
Minian Andjel, A., Bazzi, F.

(History 73 is 3 units; History 173 is 5 units.) This class examines the history of Mexican migration to the United States. In the United States we constantly hear about Obama's immigration plan, the anti-immigrant laws in Arizona, and the courage of DREAM Activists; in Mexico news sources speak... more

NATIVEAM 122 (section 1)
Historiography & Native American Oral Traditions and Narratives
2019-2020 Autumn
Tuesday Thursday
6:30pm - 8:20pm
260-011
Red Shirt, D.

This course is an introduction to Native American Literature in the United States in a (post) colonial, or decolonized context (in the last seventy years). The readings focus on the complex social and political influences that have shaped Native American literature in the last half of the... more

POLISCI 22SC (section 1)
The Face of Battle
2018-2019 Summer
Weiner, A., Sagan, S.

Our understanding of warfare often derives from the lofty perspective of political leaders and generals: what were their objectives and what strategies were developed to meet them? This top-down perspective slights the experience of the actual combatants and non-combatants caught in the... more

PUBLPOL 135 (section 1)
Regional Politics and Decision Making in Silicon Valley and the Greater Bay Area
2019-2020 Autumn
Wednesday
4:30pm - 5:50pm
110-101
Hancock, R., Benest, F.

Dynamics of regional leadership and decision making in Silicon Valley, a complex region composed of 40 cities and four counties without any overarching framework for governance. Formal and informal institutions shaping outcomes in the region. Case studies include transportation, workforce... more